Davis School District hopes $298M bond will ease space facilities problems

1605951FARMINGTON — Viewmont High School Principal Dan Linford looks forward to the day when he won’t have to keep adding portable classrooms in the parking lot, and when the neighborhood isn’t jammed with student vehicles for nine months of the year.

He also hopes the 50-year-old school building will, at some point, get air conditioning, and things will change so every day doesn’t involve safety concerns from having to accommodate hundreds of students beyond capacity.

All of it makes for an “uninspiring” place to learn, Linford said, but it’s a challenge that doesn’t seem to be going away.

“What really has us concerned are the projections on numbers,” Linford said. “Every year over the last three or four years, we seem to be adding a portable (classroom), and that growth isn’t projected to stop for a number of years.”

The Davis School District currently uses 350 portable classrooms to provide a temporary solution in schools with a fluctuating need for space. But in places such as Viewmont, the extra buildings have become a fixture on campus, increasing tardies and other discipline problems as students travel in and out

Returned missionaries others can start semester late finish on time at SLCC

1605736For most college students in Utah, fall semester began weeks ago. But students at Salt Lake Community College are getting a chance to start late and still finish on time.

For the first time, new students at the college can enroll in a condensed eight-week semester for an expanded array of courses this year. Instead of having to wait until traditional fall, spring or summer enrollment dates, they can sign up for the shorter courses mid-semester.

Historically, the college has allowed students to begin career and technical education courses in the second half of a semester. The college is now offering almost 90 general education courses through an eight-week schedule, with more than 2,300 total seats.

The admission application deadline for the alternative schedule is Sunday, and classes will begin the week of Oct. 10. More than 1,600 students had signed up for the eight-week general education courses as of Friday.

College leaders hope the new scheduling format will give students more opportunities to enroll if traditional fall and spring starting dates don’t work for them.

“The difference in this case is that we are specifically creating classes

Perfect storm warning over teacher shortages

0Teacher shortages and rising pupil numbers will create “a perfect storm” for schools in England, a head teacher has told the Conservative conference.

The crisis would harm children’s education and impair efforts to raise standards, said Allan Foulds of Cheltenham Bournside School.

The president of the Association of School and College Leaders (ASCL) said the system was near “breaking point”.

Education Secretary Nicky Morgan said she recognised the challenge ahead.

Mrs Morgan said the government wanted all schools “to be able to recruit high quality teachers who can deliver our vision of educational excellence everywhere, which is why we are focused on attracting more top graduates into the profession”.

She said teaching remained popular as a career, “with the highest numbers of people joining since 2008 and with 3% more people due to start postgraduate teacher training than this time last year”.

“However, we recognise that there is a challenge ahead as the economy continues to strengthen,” she said.

But Mr Foulds said recruitment levels were too low and a combination of factors could push the system “to breaking point”.

‘Lifeblood’

There are already too few trainee teachers to meet

Trying to keep And Breeding Crocodile Skinks

The Red eyed crocodile skink is generally unique and a fascinating lizard. In addition, it is relatively simple to keep. His or her heavily keeled skin scales and bright-orange eye rings never wait to attract attention

Many have a mainly diurnal life but nevertheless prefer low-light and cool temperature ranges, with a lot of hiding places for the terrarium floor.

A normal setup includes keeping a pair in a 20- to 25-gallon aquarium or maybe plastic tub with a display lid that can handle a full-spectrum neon light and a (50 watts or maybe less) basking mild. Keep the temperature 75 to 80 degrees through the day; it could drop about 10 degrees during the night time. Crocodile skinks never need branches or maybe plants, however they do like to swim and will probably dehydrate rapidly when kept too dry. A fairly humid, deep combination of potting soil and sphagnum moss is a good substrate.

Crickets and mealworms are staple eating habits. Change this with earthworms, little beetles, moths, spiders, caterpillars and in many cases small mosquitofish put in the water dish.

A Red eyed crocodile skink adult is sexually adult when about 12 months old and roughly 6 to 7 inches in total

4 Major Points That Help in Manual Driving of a Car

Some people still take manual driving lessons instead of automatic. For safe and reliable driving, it is important that you learn the proper combinations of manual driving from a real driving instructor.

As, we all often go for long or short drives in a car but first experience of driving manually is very conspicuous. That experience is a combination of hesitation, happiness and curiosity. Manual driving  help you a lot to understand your car components, features, their working and much more. Whenever we see someone who is driving his car, we felt that driving is very easy but when you start driving, your thinking changed. During a manual drive, you must take care about the following points:-

1. Familiar with car:-
Before starting your car, you should know about the crucial components and their places like Clutch is on the left side and race is on the right. Similarly, the stick shift have 5 or 6 gears depending on the car model and a reverse. If necessary, you can make some adjustment according to your requirements in mirrors positions. Also, adjust your driving seat so that your foot can easily reach to the clutch, brake and Race.

2. Control the speed:-
In happiness

History Cambridge University Summer School

To become knowledgeable about specific historical period, events and figures, take advantage of the History Cambridge University Summer School. Prestigious and knowledgeable historians provide courses that cover a huge range of themes discussing British dynasty plus European and global history.

Study at Cambridge Summer School and take advantage of the academic programme consisting of four special subject courses plus plenary lectures and evening talks. All courses are taught by member v;/ of the University’s Faculty of history and also by visiting academic.

Four Special Subject Courses

Specialty courses are the perfect way to learn from members of the University’s Facility of History and from visiting academics. You can take courses that cover a broad historical period or courses that are complementary to one another. History Cambridge University Summer School offers two courses per week to cover various historical topics.

Plenary Lectures

Lectures are taught by prominent historians from the University of Cambridge and academics from other countries. You are invited to discuss your ideas in the lectures. In 2015 the theme of the morning plenary lectures was Heroes and Villains. Students at Cambridge Summer School are offered exciting opportunities to learn from historical experts. You will experience the past taught in dynamic and specific ways.

Evening

RO Systems Used for Water Purification

Reverse osmosis is a great and widely used method for water purification. It is for purification of water at home as well as in industries.

Reverse osmosis (RO) is a prevalent type of water purification that is utilized by numerous individuals everywhere throughout the world. The procedure by which a reverse osmosis system works and capacities, on the other hand, is still a major puzzle to numerous individuals. Indeed, even mortgage holders who by and by introduced their own systems and have appreciated RO drinking water for a considerable length of time are regularly not totally beyond any doubt of how the film channels work. For the individuals who are occupied with the mechanics, operations and specialized functionalities of a reverse osmosis system, please read on.

Whether it’s a little 16″ RO system introduced under your kitchen counter or a gigantic distribution center estimated city RO plant, the procedure used to clean water by reverse osmosis is the same. Advanced slender film composite (TFC) reverse osmosis layers are made from sheets of manufactured polyamide layered with polysulfone and polyester bolster networks. Referred to generally in the business as leaves, various layers of these sheets are moved together firmly over a saturate water

HPLC Method Development

Before starting any analysis on HPLC, a method is doveloped that is known as HPLC analytical method. All HPLC parameters are adjusted to get the best resolution.

Diagnostic science manages methods for recognizable proof, detachment, and evaluation of the concoction parts of regular and simulated materials. The decision of systematic methodology depends on numerous contemplations, for example, compound properties of the analyte and its fixation test network, the velocity and expense of the investigation, kind of estimations i.e., quantitative or subjective and the quantity of tests. A subjective method yields data of the compound character of the species in the specimen. A quantitative method gives numerical data in regards to the relative measures of one or a greater amount of the analytes in the example.

The progressions of method development and method approval the progressions of method development and method acceptance

– Method development arrangement definition

– Background data gathering

– Laboratory method development, it incorporates different stages to be specific specimen readiness, particular logical method, discovery and information preparing

– Generation of test strategy

– An all around created method ought to be anything but difficult to accept. A method ought to be created with the objective to quickly test preclinical examples, definition models, and business

Three Practical Benefits of the Philippines K to 12 Curriculum

K to 12 curriculum in the Philippines is more than just additional two years in high school. Read this article to see the many benefits it has to offer.

The implementation of K-12 curriculum in the country drew negative reactions from various societal groups. Since 2011, critics have been very vocal on their primary concerns. They insist the government isn’t yet ready for this new system and that this is more of additional burden to students and their parents.

Despite calls to suspend the program, the government remained firm saying this new educational system offers opportunities for Filipino students and the national economy.

For its part, the Department of Education (DepEd) stresses that the country is prepared for a big shift in education system. In fact, it has worked to fulfill the gaps on the number of classrooms, teachers, and textbooks. Also, it has finished the planning phases along with stakeholders.

But what does K-12 scheme really has to offer to students?

To prove that K-12 system is more than just adding two more years to high school, below are three of the many practical benefits of schooling under a 13-year education cycle:

  1. Preparedness for tertiary learning – With adaptation of K-12 scheme, students are expected

Private school heads condemn exam marking

The heads of leading independent schools say the exam-marking system for GCSEs and A-levels is “not fit for purpose”.

Chairman Chris King will tell the Headmasters’ and Headmistresses’ Conference “urgent reform” is needed to improve the reliability of exam grades.

Last year more than 400,000 exam papers were challenged, with more than 77,000 grades being changed.

The joint exam boards body says markers are doing a “fantastic job”.

But Mr King says: “The current situation is untenable.

“We are facing a perfect storm, of both decreasing public confidence and increasing pressure in the system, as the greater emphasis on end-of-year exams creates even more work for examiners over the summer,” he will tell the HMC’s annual conference at St Andrews in Fife.

‘Unbelievable’

Mr King, head teacher of Leicester Grammar School, says marking remains a “cottage industry” that is unable to cope with the scale and stresses of the modern exam system.

Pupils can receive “frankly unbelievable marks or grades”, he says, which can mean missing out on university places.

And even if grades are improved on appeal, he says that it can be too late to take up university places, which will have already been allocated to someone else.

The most recent figures, from 2014, show that

Student leader rules out link up with advocacy group Cage

The president of the National Union of Students has emphatically ruled out working with the controversial advocacy group, Cage, which has opposed counter-terrorism legislation.

“I will not work with Cage, the NUS will not be working with Cage and there will be no NUS resources used to work with Cage,” said Megan Dunn.

The NUS had been criticised by David Cameron for “allying” with Cage.

Cage has argued counter-terror policy threatens “freedom of expression”.

The NUS president said she wanted to stop a “lack of clarity” over the relationship between the students’ union and the organisation.

Ms Dunn said the NUS was still strongly committed to opposing the government’s approach to tackling extremism on campus – but any campaign would have no connection with Cage.

Cage describes itself as “an independent organisation working to empower communities impacted by the War on Terror”.

It has criticised counter-extremism policy as creating “unprecedented levels of censorship and self-censorship of Muslim opinion”.

But Ms Dunn said she believed working with Cage would not be compatible with the NUS’s policies on “anti-racism, anti-fascism and how we define anti-semitism”.

Cage spokesman, Ibrahim Mohamoud, said: “We support the NUS’s opposition to Prevent, but we disagree strongly with Megan Dunn’s assertions about Cage.

“Islamophobia is the new

Children seeking mental health advice on internet

Children in England are turning to the internet for advice on mental health instead of talking to their school nurse or GP, it is claimed.

Children’s Commissioner for England Anne Longfield says children do not have the confidence to go to the doctor with mental health issues.

A small survey of youngsters suggests 62% have done a general internet search on issues such as depression.

The government said it was promoting greater use of counsellors in schools.

‘Desperate’

Ms Longfield said: “Every child knows if they are unwell with a stomach ache or hurt their leg, they go to the doctor or school nurse.

“Unfortunately they don’t have that confidence when it comes to mental health. It is a rather desperate state of affairs when they would prefer to roam around the internet or ask a friend the same age for help first.

“GPs really need to think seriously about this and ask if they are doing enough.

“Should they have a GP in every practice who is a specialist in children’s mental health, for example?

“Should they be advertising the fact that they are in a position to help within their surgeries?”

She added that while there were some good websites, it was really a “matter of

More than 50% of teachers in England plan to quit in next two years

More than half of teachers in England (53%) are thinking of quitting in the next two years, a survey has suggested.

The survey, conducted by the National Union of Teachers, found 61% of those wanting to leave blamed workload and 57% desired a better work/life balance.

Two thirds of the 1,020 primary and secondary school teachers questioned felt morale in the profession had declined over the past five years.

Schools minister Nick Gibb pledged to tackle excessive workloads.

The findings of the survey are timely, because last month the five main teaching unions warned of a crisis in recruitment and retention, although the government maintains the vacancy rate has stayed stable at about 1%.

The survey, undertaken with a representative sample of teachers, also suggested many were unhappy with some of the government’s plans.

  • 76% said forcing schools that require improvement to become academies would damage education
  • 62% said the plans for 500 new free schools would also damage education
  • 54% were not confident the new baseline test for four-year-olds would provide valid information about a child’s ability

General secretary of the NUT, Christine Blower, said: “This survey demonstrates the combined, negative impact of the accountability agenda on teacher workload and morale.

“Teachers feel that

Soft skills boost public school dominance says former head

It is not good grades but a “grounding in soft skills” that gives people who went to independent schools their edge, a former public school head has argued.

State schools have “much to learn” from the private sector, Dr Anthony Seldon, master of Wellington College until this year, told a conference on Friday.

Their “remorseless drive… for exam success is no longer fit for purpose”, he said at Tatler’s Schools Live.

People need the skills to do things that computers cannot, he added.

‘Teamwork’

Dr Seldon, the first speaker at the event, explained why he believes pupils need to learn teamwork, empathy and resilience to be ready for life beyond the classroom.

In his speech at the conference, which is aimed at parents looking for information on independent schools, he said: “Independent schools are taking the lead nationally in preparing students for the jobs required for the 21st Century.”

Dr Seldon, now vice-chancellor of Buckingham University, quoted a recent Harvard University study which found employers need far more than the skills developed in exams.

“They also need what is patronisingly called the ‘soft’ skills, i.e. those that cannot be replicated by computers, which are fast taking over not just manual but professional jobs also.

“These are the

University rankings UK a stand out performer

The UK has 34 universities in the Times Higher Education ranking of the world’s top 200 institutions.

Oxford climbs to second place, while Cambridge and Imperial College London also make the top 10 in fourth and eighth places respectively.

Keeping the top spot for the fifth consecutive year is the California Institute of Technology in the US.

Europe has a record number of universities in the world top 200, with 105 compared to 87 last year.

The tables rank universities worldwide on measures like teaching, research and international outlook – for example numbers of overseas students and staff.

The majority of UK universities have moved up this year, some – for example Warwick, St Andrews and Exeter – by a significant margin.

There is good news for Reading, Dundee and Newcastle, re-establishing their places in the top 200 after slipping out last year.

However, four universities – Manchester, York, Sussex and Royal Holloway, London – have slipped to lower positions in the tables, compared with last year when there were only 29 UK institutions in the top 200.

US institutions

While the US remains the world leader when it comes to elite universities, its dominance has been eroded this year.

It has six of the top 10 universities

Exeter University and Pearson plan online postgraduate degrees

Postgraduates could have the option to study online at a leading UK university from next year.

The University of Exeter has announced an “international partnership” with education giant Pearson to develop online masters’ degrees.

The university says they are “currently researching the potential to deliver online postgraduate degrees in a variety of subjects”.

It adds: “It is intended that courses will start as early as September 2016.”

Pearson, best known in the UK as an educational publisher and owner of the Edexcel exam board, already helps run similar courses in the United States at Arizona State University, which offers more than 70 degrees entirely online at both graduate and undergraduate level.

Flexible study

The announcement says the Exeter degrees will allow students, many of whom will be fitting their studies around full-time jobs, to access course material when and where it suits them.

The university says it will focus initially on taught masters’ degrees which will be “competitively priced with ‘on the ground’ courses”.

The new courses will include weekly interactive online teaching sessions delivered from university faculties, it adds, while students who take degrees in this way would have to meet the same entry standards as those who study in person.

Exeter University’s provost, Prof Janice

Tougher visas would cut overseas student numbers

University groups are warning that tighter visa rules, claimed to be under consideration by the Home Office, would cut overseas student numbers by 15%.

The proposals are believed to include tougher English language requirements for students.

Dominic Scott, head of the UK Council for International Student Affairs, said it would be a “nail in the coffin” for recruiting overseas students.

The Home Office has argued there are no limits on numbers of genuine students.

Universities have already been lobbying ministers to remove overseas students from migration targets – but the new English language proposals, if they were given the go-ahead, would mean even an higher threshold for entry.

Universities argue that overseas students are increasingly important to the UK economy and that raising more barriers sends out a negative message in this competitive global market.

Universities UK says overseas students are worth £7bn to the UK each year.

Mr Scott, head of the advisory body on international students, described the revised language requirements as “pretty extreme”.

He warned that if implemented they would have a “massively damaging effect” on universities wanting to recruit overseas students, preventing about 15% of the current intake from gaining visas.

Mr Scott said universities of all kinds saw the proposals as a “major

Greek tragedy for education opportunities

When considering the effects of the debt crisis on Greece, most people probably think of long queues outside banks and protests in the streets.

A less visible but perhaps further reaching outcome is that Greece’s education system has become one of the most unequal in the developed world.

Although education in Greece is free, public schools are suffering from spending cuts imposed as a condition of the bailout agreements.

In practice, over the last 30 years it has become increasingly necessary for students to pay for expensive private tuition to pass the famously difficult Panhellenic exams required to get to university.

But with unemployment rising and salaries falling, many poor and middle-class families are struggling to pay for this extra tuition.

A World Economic Forum report this month ranked Greece last of 30 advanced economies for education because of the close relationship between students’ performance and their parents’ income.

And a professor of law and economics at the University of Athens warns that losing talented students from poor backgrounds is a “national catastrophe” which could hinder Greece’s long-term economic recovery.

Tuition costs

Greece’s education system was designed around the principle of equality.

Article 16 of the constitution guarantees free education at all levels and university admission is

Denmark reinvents lessons for reluctant learners

How do you get young adults back into education if they dropped out and had a negative experience of learning?

How do you show those who failed first time round that the door is still open? How do you get out-of-work youngsters to decide that it’s worth their while to get qualifications?

Reaching out to the educationally excluded isn’t some kind of philanthropic exercise. It’s a very practical and often intractable economic problem for many developed countries.

It is a worst-of-both-worlds position of having unemployed youngsters at the same time as having firms struggling to cope with a shortage of skilled staff.

Denmark is no exception. About 12% of the country’s 15 to 29-year-olds are counted as not in education, employment or training or “Neet”. At the same time there are “talent shortages” for a range of skilled jobs which means recruiting overseas.

Connected classroom

But where are these young adults going to study?

Voksenuddannelsescenter Syd – or VUC Syd – is offering a different kind of model for such young learners.

This adult education centre, beside a fjord in Haderslev in southern Denmark, is based in a state-of-the-art, £25m building that seems to have gone to great lengths to look nothing like a school.

It’s open to

Computers do not improve pupil results says OECD

Investing heavily in school computers and classroom technology does not improve pupils’ performance, says a global study from the OECD.

The think tank says frequent use of computers in schools is more likely to be associated with lower results.

The OECD’s education director Andreas Schleicher says school technology had raised “too many false hopes”.

Tom Bennett, the government’s expert on pupil behaviour, said teachers had been “dazzled” by school computers.

The report from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development examines the impact of school technology on international test results, such as the Pisa tests taken in more than 70 countries and tests measuring digital skills.

It says education systems which have invested heavily in information and communications technology have seen “no noticeable improvement” in Pisa test results for reading, mathematics or science.

Unplugged

“If you look at the best-performing education systems, such as those in East Asia, they’ve been very cautious about using technology in their classrooms,” said Mr Schleicher.

“Those students who use tablets and computers very often tend to do worse than those who use them moderately.”

Annual global spending on educational technology in schools has been valued at £17.5bn, by technology analysts Gartner. In the UK, the spending on technology in schools is